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Titel
Under pressure? Assessing the roles of skills and other personal resources for work-life strains / Niels-Hugo Blunch (Washington and Lee University and IZA), David Ribar (University of Melbourne and IZA), Mark Western (University of Queensland) ; IZA Institute of Labor Economics
VerfasserBlunch, Niels-Hugo ; Ribar, David C. ; Western, Mark
KörperschaftForschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit
ErschienenBonn, Germany : IZA Institute of Labor Economics, December 2018
Ausgabe
Elektronische Ressource
Umfang1 Online-Ressource (30 Seiten)
SerieDiscussion paper ; no. 12055
URNurn:nbn:de:hbz:5:2-175368 
Zugriffsbeschränkung
 Das Dokument ist öffentlich zugänglich im Rahmen des deutschen Urheberrechts.
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Under pressure? Assessing the roles of skills and other personal resources for work-life strains [0.37 mb]
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Zusammenfassung (Englisch)

Many working parents struggle to balance the demands of their jobs and family roles. Although we might expect that additional resources would ease work-family constraints, theory and evidence regarding resources have been equivocal. This study uses data on working mothers and fathers - as well as their cohabiting partners/spouses - from the Household, Income, and Labour Dynamics in Australia survey to investigate how personal resources in the form of skills, cognitive abilities, and personality traits affect work-life strains. It considers these along with standard measures of economic, social, and personal resources, and estimates seemingly unrelated regression (SUR) models of work-life strains for employed mothers and fathers that account for correlations of the couple's unobserved characteristics. The SUR estimates indicate that computer skills reduce work-life strains for mothers, that math skills reduce strains for fathers, and that the personality traits of extraversion, conscientiousness, and emotional stability reduce strains for both parents. However, the estimates also indicate that better performance on a symbol look-up task, which tests attention, visual scanning acuity, and motor speed, increases fathers' work-life strains.