Titelaufnahme

Titel
Health and economic growth : reconciling the micro and macro evidence / David E. Bloom (Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and IZA), David Canning (Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health), Rainer Kotschy (LMU Munich), Klaus Prettner (University of Hohenheim), Johannes Schünemann (University of Göttingen) ; IZA Institute of Labor Economics
VerfasserBloom, David E. In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Canning, David In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Kotschy, Rainer In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Prettner, Klaus In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Schünemann, Johannes In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen
KörperschaftForschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen
ErschienenBonn, Germany : IZA Institute of Labor Economics, November 2018
Ausgabe
Elektronische Ressource
Umfang1 Online-Ressource (29 Seiten) : Diagramme
SerieDiscussion paper ; no. 11940
URNurn:nbn:de:hbz:5:2-172714 Persistent Identifier (URN)
Zugriffsbeschränkung
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Volltexte
Health and economic growth [1.19 mb]
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Zusammenfassung (Englisch)

Micro-based and macro-based approaches have been used to assess the effects of health on economic growth. Micro-based approaches aggregate the return on individual health from Mincerian wage regressions to derive the macroeconomic effects of population health. Macro-based approaches estimate a generalized aggregate production function that decomposes output into its components. The microbased approach tends to find smaller effects than the macro-based approach, thus presenting a micromacro puzzle regarding the economic return on health. We reconcile these two strands of literature by showing that the point estimate of the macroeconomic effect of health is quantitatively close to that found by aggregating the microeconomic effects, controlling for potential spillovers of population health at the aggregate level. Our results justify using the microbased approach to estimate the direct economic benefits of health interventions.