Titelaufnahme

Titel
Emigration, remittances and the subjective well-being of those staying behind / Artjoms Ivlevs (University of the West of England and IZA), Milena Nikolova (University of Groningen, IZA and Brookings), Carol Graham (The Brookings Institution, University of Maryland and IZA) ; IZA Institute of Labor Economics
VerfasserIvlevs, Artjoms ; Nikolova, Milena ; Graham, Carol
KörperschaftForschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit
ErschienenBonn, Germany : IZA Institute of Labor Economics, March 2018
Ausgabe
Elektronische Ressource
Umfang1 Online-Ressource (74 Seiten)
SerieDiscussion paper ; no. 11437
URNurn:nbn:de:hbz:5:2-154038 
Zugriffsbeschränkung
 Das Dokument ist öffentlich zugänglich im Rahmen des deutschen Urheberrechts.
Volltexte
Emigration, remittances and the subjective well-being of those staying behind [0.75 mb]
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Zusammenfassung

Despite growing academic and policy interest in the subjective well-being consequences of emigration for those left behind, existing studies have focused on single origin countries or specific world regions. Our study is the first to offer a global perspective on the well-being consequences of emigration for those staying behind using several subjective well-being measures (evaluations of best possible life, positive affect, stress, and depression). Drawing upon Gallup World Poll data for 114 countries during 2009-2011, we find that both having family members abroad and receiving remittances are positively associated with evaluative well-being (evaluations of best possible life) and positive affect (measured by an index of variables related to experiencing positive feelings at a particular point in time). Our analysis provides novel results showing that remittances are particularly beneficial for evaluative well-being in less developed and more unequal contexts; in richer countries, only the outmigration of family members is positively associated with life evaluations, while remittances have no additional association. We also find that having household members abroad is linked with increased stress and depression, which are not offset by remittances. The outmigration of family members appears more traumatic in contexts where migration is less common, such as more developed countries, and specific world regions, such as Latin America and Sub-Saharan Africa, as well as among women. Relying on subjective wellbeing measures, which reflect both material and non-material aspects of life and are broad measures of well-being, allows us to provide additional insights and a more well-rounded picture of the possible consequences of emigration on migrant family members staying behind relative to standard outcomes employed in the literature, such as the left-behind's consumption, income or labor market responses.