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Titel
Masculine vs feminine personality traits and women's employment outcomes in Britain: a field experiment / Nick Drydakis (Anglia Ruskin University and IZA), Katerina Sidiropoulou (Anglia Ruskin University), Swetketu Patnaik (Anglia Ruskin University), Sandra Selmanovic (Anglia Ruskin University), Vasiliki Bozani (University of Cyprus) ; IZA Institute of Labor Economics
VerfasserDrydakis, Nick In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Sidiropoulou, Katerina In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Patnaik, Swetketu In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Selmanovic, Sandra In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Bozani, Vasiliki In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen
KörperschaftForschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen
ErschienenBonn, Germany : IZA Institute of Labor Economics, November 2017
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Elektronische Ressource
Umfang1 Online-Ressource (21 Seiten) : Diagramme
SerieDiscussion paper ; no. 11179
URNurn:nbn:de:hbz:5:2-144221 Persistent Identifier (URN)
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Masculine vs feminine personality traits and women's employment outcomes in Britain: a field experiment [0.35 mb]
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Zusammenfassung

In the current study, we utilized a correspondent test to capture the way in which firms respond to women who exhibit masculine and feminine personality traits. In doing so, we minimized the potential for reverse causality bias and unobserved heterogeneities to occur. Women who exhibit masculine personality traits have a 4.3 percentage points greater likelihood of gaining access to occupations than those displaying feminine personality traits. In both male- and female-dominated occupations, women with masculine personality traits have an occupational access advantage, as compared to those exhibiting feminine personality traits. Moreover, women with masculine personality traits take up positions which offer 10 percentage points higher wages, in comparison with those displaying feminine personality traits. Furthermore, wage premiums are higher for those exhibiting masculine personality traits in male-dominated occupations, than for female-dominated positions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first field experiment to examine the effect of masculine and feminine personality traits on entry-level pay scales. As feminine personality traits are stereotypically attributed to women, and these characteristics appear to yield fewer rewards within the market, they may offer one of many plausible explanations as to why women experience higher unemployment rates, whilst also receiving lower earnings, as compared to men.