Titelaufnahme

Titel
What drives the gender wage gap? : examining the roles of sorting, productivity differences, and discrimination / Isabelle Sin (Motu Economic and Public Policy Research), Steven Stillman (Free University of Bozen-Bolzano and IZA), Richard Fabling (independent researcher) ; IZA Institute of Labor Economics
VerfasserSin, Isabelle In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Stillman, Steven In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Fabling, Richard In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen
KörperschaftForschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen
ErschienenBonn, Germany : IZA Institute of Labor Economics, August 2017
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Elektronische Ressource
Umfang1 Online-Ressource (25 Seiten, 10 ungezählte Seiten) : Diagramme
SerieDiscussion paper ; no. 10975
URNurn:nbn:de:hbz:5:2-138565 Persistent Identifier (URN)
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Volltexte
What drives the gender wage gap? [0.42 mb]
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Zusammenfassung

As in other OECD countries, women in New Zealand earn substantially less than men with similar observable characteristics. In this paper, we use a decade of annual wage and productivity data from New Zealands Linked Employer-Employee Database to examine different explanations for this gender wage gap. Sorting by gender at either the industry or firm level explains less than one-fifth of the overall wage gap. Gender differences in productivity within firms also explain little of the difference seen in wages. The relationships between the gender wage-productivity gap and both age and tenure are inconsistent with statistical discrimination being an important explanatory factor for the remaining differences in wages. Relating across industry and over time variation in the gender wage-productivity gap to industry-year variation in worker skills, and product market and labor market competition, we find evidence that is consistent with taste discrimination being important for explaining the overall gender wage gap. Explanations based on gender differences in bargaining power are less consistent with our findings.