Titelaufnahme

Titel
The gender wage gap in Europe : job preferences, gender convergence and distributional effects / Paul Redmond (ESRI), Seamus McGuinness (ESRI and IZA) ; IZA Institute of Labor Economics
VerfasserRedmond, Paul In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; McGuinness, Séamus In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen
KörperschaftForschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen
ErschienenBonn, Germany : IZA Institute of Labor Economics, August 2017
Ausgabe
Elektronische Ressource
Umfang1 Online-Ressource (25 Seiten) : Diagramme
SerieDiscussion paper ; no. 10933
URNurn:nbn:de:hbz:5:2-137368 Persistent Identifier (URN)
Zugriffsbeschränkung
 Das Dokument ist frei verfügbar.
Volltexte
The gender wage gap in Europe [0.43 mb]
Links
Nachweis
Verfügbarkeit In meiner Bibliothek
Zusammenfassung

The gender wage gap has declined in magnitude over time; however, the gap that remains is largely unexplained due to gender convergence in key wage determining characteristics. In this paper we show that the degree of gender convergence differs across countries in Europe. Most, if not all, of the wage gap is unexplained in some countries, predominantly in Eastern Europe, while in some central and peripheral countries, differences between the characteristics of males and females can still explain a relatively large proportion of the wage gap. We investigate whether gender differences relating to job preferences play a role in explaining the gender wage gap. We find that females are more motivated than males to find a job that is closer to home and offers job security, whereas males are motivated by financial gain. The average gender wage differential in Europe is 12.2 percent and gender differences in job preferences are associated with a 1.3 percentage point increase in the wage gap. We find that preferences explain more of the gender wage gap than the individual components relating to age, tenure and previous employment status. A quantile decomposition reveals that job preferences play a greater role in explaining the wage gap at the top of the wage distribution.