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Titel
Analyzing wage differentials by fields of study: evidence from Turkey / Antonio Di Paolo (AQR-IREA, University of Barcelona), Aysit Tansel (Middle East Technical University, ERF and IZA) ; IZA Institute of Labor Economics
VerfasserDi Paolo, Antonio In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Tansel, Aysıt In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Nybom, Martin In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Öckert, Björn In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen
KörperschaftForschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen
ErschienenBonn, Germany : IZA Institute of Labor Economics, July 2017
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Elektronische Ressource
Umfang1 Online-Ressource (48 Seiten) : Diagramme
SerieDiscussion paper ; no. 10915
URNurn:nbn:de:hbz:5:2-135981 Persistent Identifier (URN)
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Analyzing wage differentials by fields of study: evidence from Turkey [0.71 mb]
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Zusammenfassung

This paper analyzes the drivers of wage differences among college graduates who hold a degree in a different field of study. We focus on Turkey, an emerging country that is characterized by a sustained expansion of higher education. We estimate conditional wage gaps by field of study using OLS regressions. Average differentials are subsequently decomposed into the contribution of observable characteristics (endowment) and unobservable characteristics (returns). To shed light on distributional wage disparities by field of study, we provide estimates along the unconditional wage distribution by means of RIF-Regressions. Finally, we also decompose the contribution of explained and unexplained factors in accounting for wage gaps along the whole distribution. As such, this is the first work providing evidence on distributional wage differences by college major for a developing country. The results indicate the existence of important wage differences by field of study, which are partly accounted by differences in observable characteristics (especially occupation and, to a lesser extent, employment sector). These pay gaps are also heterogeneous over the unconditional distribution of wages, as is the share of wage differentials that can be attributed to differences in observable characteristics across workers with degrees in different fields of study.