Titelaufnahme

Titel
Caregivers in the family : daughters, sons and social norms / Francesca Barigozzi (University of Bologna), Helmuth Cremer (Toulouse School of Economics and IZA), Kerstin Roeder (University of Augsburg) ; IZA Institute of Labor Economics
VerfasserBarigozzi, Francesca In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Francesca Barigozzi ; Cremer, Helmuth In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Helmuth Cremer ; Roeder, Kerstin In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Kerstin Roeder
KörperschaftForschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit
ErschienenBonn, Germany : IZA Institute of Labor Economics, June 2017
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Elektronische Ressource
Umfang1 Online-Ressource (30 Seiten)
SerieDiscussion paper ; no. 10862
URNurn:nbn:de:hbz:5:2-134799 Persistent Identifier (URN)
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Zusammenfassung

Daughters are the principal caregivers of their dependent parents. In this paper, we study long-term care (LTC) choices by bargaining families with mixed- or same-gender siblings. LTC care can be provided either informally by children, or formally at home or in an institution. A social norm implies that daughters suffer a psychological cost when they provide less informal care than the average child. We show that the laissez-faire (LF) and the utilitarian first-best (FB) differ for two reasons. First, because informal care imposes a negative externality on daughters via the social norm, too much informal care is provided in LF. Second, the weights children and parents have in the family bargaining problem might differ in general from their weights in social welfare. We show that the FB allocation can be achieved through a system of subsidies on formal home and institutional care. Except when children and parents have equal bargaining weights these subsidies are gender-specific and reflect Pigouvian as well as "paternalistic" considerations.