Titelaufnahme

Titel
The impact of sleep restriction on contributions and punishment : first evidence / Jeremy Clark (University of Canterbury), David L Dickinson (Appalachian State University, IZA and ESI) ; IZA Institute of Labor Economics
VerfasserClark, Jeremy In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Dickinson, David L. In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen
KörperschaftForschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen
ErschienenBonn, Germany : IZA Institute of Labor Economics, June 2017
Ausgabe
Elektronische Ressource
Umfang1 Online-Ressource (35 Seiten) : Diagramme
SerieDiscussion paper ; no. 10823
URNurn:nbn:de:hbz:5:2-127003 Persistent Identifier (URN)
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Volltexte
The impact of sleep restriction on contributions and punishment [0.72 mb]
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Zusammenfassung

We implement a one-week partial sleep restriction protocol to investigate the effect of sleep deprivation on joint production in a standard voluntary contributions mechanism (VCM) experiment. Additionally, the effect of sleep restriction on an individuals likelihood of sending costly peer punishment is examined. Actigraphy sleep monitoring watches are used to validate that our random assignment to sleep restricted (SR) and well-rested (WR) conditions generates significant differences in both objective nightly sleep duration and subject sleepiness. Using multiple measures of sleep restriction, and non-parametric as well as regression analysis, we find that when punishment is not available, sleep restriction does not affect the contributions made to joint production. When punishment is available, we find weak evidence that SR subjects contribute more than WR subjects, but there is no evidence that SR and WR subjects differ in the amount they punish others. However, we also find that SR subject contributions are significantly more sensitive to the introduction of peer punishment. SR subject punishment decisions may also be more sensitive to the deviation of their contributions from other group members contributions and more sensitive to having received punishment themselves. Our results have implications for understanding how the norm enforcement availability may differentially impact individuals depending on their current sleep state.