Titelaufnahme

Titel
What drives differences in management? / Nicholas Bloom (Stanford University, NBER and IZA), Erik Brynjolfsson (MIT and NBER), Lucia Foster (U.S. Census Bureau), Ron Jarmin (U.S. Census Bureau), Megha Patnaik (Stanford University), Itay Saporta-Eksten (Tel-Aviv University and UCL), John van Reenen (MIT, CEP, NBER and IZA) ; IZA, Institute of Labor Economics
VerfasserBloom, Nick In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Nick Bloom ; Brynjolfsson, Erik In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Erik Brynjolfsson ; Foster, Lucia In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Lucia Foster ; Jarmin, Ronald S. In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Ronald S. Jarmin ; Patnaik, Megha In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Megha Patnaik ; Saporta-Eksten, Itay In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Itay Saporta-Eksten ; Van Reenen, John In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach John Van Reenen
KörperschaftForschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit
ErschienenBonn, Germany : IZA Institute of Labor Economics, April 2017
Ausgabe
Elektronische Ressource
Umfang1 Online-Ressource (36, 11 Seiten) : Diagramme
SerieDiscussion paper ; no. 10724
URNurn:nbn:de:hbz:5:2-122067 Persistent Identifier (URN)
Zugriffsbeschränkung
 Das Dokument ist frei verfügbar.
Volltexte
What drives differences in management? [0.92 mb]
Links
Nachweis
Verfügbarkeit In meiner Bibliothek
Zusammenfassung

Partnering with the Census we implement a new survey of "structured" management practices in 32,000 US manufacturing plants. We find an enormous dispersion of management practices across plants, with 40% of this variation across plants within the same firm. This management variation accounts for about a fifth of the spread of productivity, a similar fraction as that accounted for by R&D, and twice as much as explained by IT. We find evidence for four "drivers" of management: competition, business environment, learning spillovers and human capital. Collectively, these drivers account for about a third of the dispersion of structured management practices.