Titelaufnahme

Titel
The impact of parental health on children's schooling and labour force participation : evidence from Vietnam / Silvia Mendolia (University of Wollongong and IZA), Thi Nguyen (University of Wollongong), Oleg Yerokhin (University of Wollongong) ; IZA, Institute of Labor Economics
VerfasserMendolia, Silvia In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Silvia Mendolia ; Nguyen, Thi In Wikipedia suchen nach Thi Nguyen ; Yerokhin, Oleg In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Oleg Yerokhin
KörperschaftForschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit
ErschienenBonn, Germany : IZA Institute of Labor Economics, March 2017
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Elektronische Ressource
Umfang1 Online-Ressource (25 Seiten)
SerieDiscussion paper ; no. 10651
URNurn:nbn:de:hbz:5:2-120830 Persistent Identifier (URN)
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The impact of parental health on children's schooling and labour force participation [0.61 mb]
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Zusammenfassung

This paper investigates the relationship between parental health shocks and childrens engagement in education and labour market, using a panel data survey of Vietnamese families, interviewed between 2004 and 2008. While there is substantial evidence showing the intergenerational transmission of health, the literature investigating the impact of parental health on childrens educational and labour market outcomes is limited, especially in developing countries. We use child fixed effects and control for a detailed set of household and local area characteristics. Our main findings show that maternal illness substantially decreases chances of being enrolled in school for children between 10 and 23 years old and, at the same time, increases the childrens likelihood of entering the labour market and working more hours for children aged 10-15 years old. The effect is particularly pronounced for girls, who seem to experience worst adverse consequences in terms of education and labour market engagement.