Titelaufnahme

Titel
A framework for separating individual treatment effects from spillover, interaction, and general equilibrium effects / Martin Huber (University of Fribourg), Andreas Steinmayr (University of Munich, IfW Kiel, and IZA) ; IZA, Institute of Labor Economics
VerfasserHuber, Martin In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Martin Huber ; Steinmayr, Andreas In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Andreas Steinmayr
KörperschaftForschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit
ErschienenBonn, Germany : IZA Institute of Labor Economics, March 2017
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Elektronische Ressource
Umfang1 Online-Ressource (39 Seiten)
SerieDiscussion paper ; no. 10648
URNurn:nbn:de:hbz:5:2-118946 Persistent Identifier (URN)
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 Das Dokument ist frei verfügbar.
Volltexte
A framework for separating individual treatment effects from spillover, interaction, and general equilibrium effects [0.49 mb]
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Zusammenfassung

This paper suggests a causal framework for disentangling individual level treatment effects and interference effects, i.e., general equilibrium, spillover, or interaction effects related to treatment distribution. Thus, the framework allows for a relaxation of the Stable Unit Treatment Value Assumption (SUTVA), which assumes away any form of treatment-dependent interference between study participants. Instead, we permit interference effects within aggregate units, for example, regions or local labor markets, but need to rule out interference effects between these aggregate units. Borrowing notation from the causal mediation literature, we define a range of policy-relevant effects and formally discuss identification based on randomization, selection on observables, and difference-in-differences. We also present an application to a policy intervention extending unemployment benefit durations in selected regions of Austria that arguably affected ineligibles in treated regions through general equilibrium effects in local labor markets.