Titelaufnahme

Titel
Do constraints on women worsen child deprivations? Framework, measurement, and evidence from India / Alberto Posso (RMIT University and UNICEF), Stephen C. Smith (George Washington University, UNICEF and IZA), Lucia Ferrone (UNICEF) ; IZA Institute of Labor Economics
VerfasserPosso, Alberto ; Smith, Stephen C. ; Ferrone, Lucia
KörperschaftForschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit
ErschienenBonn, Germany : IZA Institute of Labor Economics, March 2019
Ausgabe
Elektronische Ressource
Umfang1 Online-Ressource (30 Seiten)
SerieDiscussion paper ; no. 12196
URNurn:nbn:de:hbz:5:2-184512 
Zugriffsbeschränkung
 Das Dokument ist öffentlich zugänglich im Rahmen des deutschen Urheberrechts.
Volltexte
Do constraints on women worsen child deprivations? Framework, measurement, and evidence from India [0.64 mb]
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Zusammenfassung (Englisch)

This paper provides a framework for analyzing constraints that apply specifically to women, which theory suggests may have negative impacts on child outcomes (as well as on women). We classify womens constraints into four dimensions: (i) domestic physcial and psychological abuse, (ii) low influence on household decisions, (iii) restrictions on mobility, and (iv) limited information access. Each of these constraints are in principle determined within households. We test the impact of womens constraints on child outcomes using nationally representative household Demographic and Health Survey data from India, including 53,030 mothers and 113,708 children, collected in 2015-16. Outcomes are measured as multidimensional deprivations, utilizing UNICEFs Multidimensional Overlapping Deprivation Analysis index, incorporating deficiencies in childrens access to water, sanitation, housing, healthcare, nutrition, education and information. We identify causal impacts using a Lewbel specification and present an array of additional econometric strategies and robustness checks. We find that children of women who are subjected to domestic abuse, have low influence in decision making, and limited freedom of mobility are more likely to be deprived.