Titelaufnahme

Titel
An overview of German new economic sociology and the contribution of the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies / John Wilkinson
VerfasserWilkinson, John
ErschienenKöln : Max-Planck-Institut für Gesellschaftsforschung, February 2019
Ausgabe
Elektronische Ressource
Umfang1 Online-Ressource (iv, 25 Seiten)
Anmerkung
Zusammenfassung in deutscher und englischer Sprache
SerieMPIfG discussion paper ; 19/3
URNurn:nbn:de:hbz:5:2-182355 
Zugriffsbeschränkung
 Das Dokument ist öffentlich zugänglich im Rahmen des deutschen Urheberrechts.
Volltexte
An overview of German new economic sociology and the contribution of the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies [3.2 mb]
Links
Nachweis
Verfügbarkeit In meiner Bibliothek
Zusammenfassung

New economic sociology (NES) in Germany has many similarities with economic sociology in the United States in its conscious efforts to institutionalize its presence within the broader sociology community, its promotion of a canon via handbooks, and its focus on the sociology of markets. At the same time, it differs in its stronger connections to the German classics, the greater vitality of a macrosociological tradition in Germany, the prior existence of a "bridging" generation of economic sociologists, and its later consolidation in a period of neo-liberal globalization, all of which have given NES in the German-speaking world a distinctive character. In addition, it has been influenced by successive waves of French economic sociology - Bourdieu, convention, and actor-network theory - and its bilingual academic tradition has ensured its integration into English-speaking NES. In its contribution to the sociology of markets, the fact that NES emerged later in Germany than in the US led to a greater concern with quality markets rather than commodity markets, and a concomitantly greater attention to issues of value and price. These latter themes, in their turn, establish a continuity with German economic sociology' enduring concern with understanding the role of money. Not surprisingly, therefore, German NES is now making key contributions to discussions on the sociology of money and is increasingly situating its analysis within the broader dynamic of capitalism and current processes of financialization.