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Titel
Anti-social behavior in groups / Michal Bauer (CERGE-EI, Institute of Economic Studies at Charles University and IZA), Jana Cahlíková (Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance), Dagmara Celik Katreniak (National Research University and CERGE-EI), Julie Chytilová (Institute of Economic Studies at Charles University and CERGE-EI), Lubomír Cingl (University of Economics Prague), Tomáš Želinský (Technical University of Košice and Institue of Economic Studies at Charles University) ; IZA Institute of Labor Economics
VerfasserBauer, Michal In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Cahlíková, Jana In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Celik Katreniak, Dagmara In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Chytilová, Julie In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Cingl, Lubomír ; Želinský, Tomáš In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen
KörperschaftForschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen
ErschienenBonn, Germany : IZA Institute of Labor Economics, November 2018
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Elektronische Ressource
Umfang1 Online-Ressource (51 Seiten) : Diagramme, Karten
SerieDiscussion paper ; no. 11944
URNurn:nbn:de:hbz:5:2-172679 Persistent Identifier (URN)
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Anti-social behavior in groups [0.73 mb]
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Zusammenfassung (Englisch)

This paper provides strong evidence supporting the long-standing speculation that decision-making in groups has a dark side, by magnifying the prevalence of anti-social behavior towards outsiders. A large-scale experiment implemented in Slovakia and Uganda (N=2,309) reveals that deciding in a group with randomly assigned peers increases the prevalence of anti-social behavior that reduces everyone's payoff but which improves the relative position of own group. The effects are driven by the influence of a group context on individual behavior, rather than by group deliberation. The observed patterns are strikingly similar on both continents.