Titelaufnahme

Titel
The formation and malleability of dietary habits : a field experiment with low income families / Michèle Belot (European University Institute, University of Edinburgh and IZA), Noemi Berlin (CNRS, EconomiX, University Paris-Nanterre), Jonathan James (University of Bath), Valeria Skafida (University of Edinburgh) ; IZA Institute of Labor Economics
VerfasserBelot, Michèle In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Berlin, Noémi In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; James, Jonathan G. In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Skafida, Valeria In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen
KörperschaftForschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen
ErschienenBonn, Germany : IZA Institute of Labor Economics, February 2018
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Elektronische Ressource
Umfang1 Online-Ressource (42, 4, 10 ungezählte Seiten, 15 Seiten)
SerieDiscussion paper ; no. 11317
URNurn:nbn:de:hbz:5:2-150089 Persistent Identifier (URN)
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The formation and malleability of dietary habits [3.01 mb]
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Zusammenfassung

We conduct a field experiment to evaluate the extent to which dietary habits are malleable early on in childhood and later in life. We implement two treatments one that targets what people eat, the other that targets the timing and frequency of food intake. 285 low income families with young children were recruited and assigned either to a control group or one of the two treatments, each of them lasting for 12 consecutive weeks. In one treatment, families received food groceries at home for free for 12 weeks and were asked to prepare five specific healthy meals per week. In the other treatment, families were simply asked to reduce snacking and eat at regular times. We collected a range of measures of food preferences, dietary intake, as well as BMI and biomarkers based on blood samples. We find evidence that childrens BMI distribution shifted significantly relative to the control group, i.e. they became relatively “thinner”. We also find some evidence that their preferences have been affected by both treatments. On the other hand, we find little evidence of effects on parents. We conclude that exposure to a healthy diet and regularity of food intake possibly play a role in shaping dietary habits, but influencing dietary choices later on in life remains a major challenge.