Titelaufnahme

Titel
Intimate partner violence and the business cycle / Sonia Bhalotra (University of Essex and IZA), Uma Kambhampati (University of Reading), Samantha Rawlings (University of Reading), Zahra Siddique (University of Bristol and IZA) ; IZA Institute of Labor Economics
VerfasserBhalotra, Sonia R. In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Kambhampati, Uma S. In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Rawlings, Samantha In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Siddique, Zahra In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen
KörperschaftForschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen
ErschienenBonn, Germany : IZA Institute of Labor Economics, January 2018
Ausgabe
Elektronische Ressource
Umfang1 Online-Ressource (36 Seiten) : Diagramme
SerieDiscussion paper ; no. 11274
URNurn:nbn:de:hbz:5:2-147838 Persistent Identifier (URN)
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Volltexte
Intimate partner violence and the business cycle [0.89 mb]
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Zusammenfassung

We examine the impact of business cycle variation on intimate partner violence using representative data from thirty one developing countries, through 2005 to 2016. We distinguish male from female unemployment rates, identifying the influence of each conditional upon the other. We find that a one percent increase in the male unemployment rate increases the incidence of physical violence against women by 0.50 percentage points, or 2.75 percent. This is consistent with the financial and psychological stress generated by unemployment. Increases in female unemployment rates (corresponding to decreases in women's employment opportunities), conditional upon rates of male unemployment reduce the incidence of violence; a one percent increase being associated with a decrease in the probability of victimization of 0.52 percentage points, or 2.87 percent. This is consistent with 'male backlash'. These patterns of behaviour are stronger among better educated women and weaker among women who have had at least one son.