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Titel
Early-life correlates of later-life well-being : evidence from the Wisconsin longitudinal study / Andrew E. Clark (Paris School of Economics-CNRS and IZA), Tom Lee (Institute for Fiscal Studies) ; IZA Institute of Labor Economics
VerfasserClark, Andrew E. In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen ; Lee, Tom In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen
KörperschaftForschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen
ErschienenBonn, Germany : IZA Institute of Labor Economics, November 2017
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Elektronische Ressource
Umfang1 Online-Ressource (37 Seiten) : Diagramme
SerieDiscussion paper ; no. 11135
URNurn:nbn:de:hbz:5:2-142982 Persistent Identifier (URN)
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Early-life correlates of later-life well-being [0.42 mb]
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Zusammenfassung

We here use data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS) to provide one of the first analyses of the distal (early-life) and proximal (later-life) correlates of older-life subjective well-being. Unusually, we have two distinct measures of the latter: happiness and eudaimonia. Even after controlling for proximal covariates, outcomes at age 18 (IQ score, parental income and parental education) remain good predictors of well-being over 50 years later. In terms of the proximal covariates, mental health and social participation are the strongest predictors of both measures of well-being in older age. However, there are notable differences in the other correlates of happiness and eudaimonia. As such, wellbeing policy will depend to an extent on which measure is preferred.