Titelaufnahme

Titel
The relative labour market performance of former international students : evidence from the Canadian national graduates survey / Zong Jia Chen (University of Waterloo), Mikal Skuterud (University of Waterloo and IZA) ; IZA, Institute of Labor Economics
VerfasserChen, Zong Jia ; Skuterud, Mikal In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen
KörperschaftForschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen
ErschienenBonn, Germany : IZA Institute of Labor Economics, April 2017
Ausgabe
Elektronische Ressource
Umfang1 Online-Ressource (20 Seiten) : Diagramme
SerieDiscussion paper ; no. 10699
URNurn:nbn:de:hbz:5:2-121494 Persistent Identifier (URN)
Zugriffsbeschränkung
 Das Dokument ist frei verfügbar.
Volltexte
The relative labour market performance of former international students [0.46 mb]
Links
Nachweis
Verfügbarkeit In meiner Bibliothek
Zusammenfassung

Canada is increasingly looking to international students as a source of postsecondary tuition revenues and new immigrants. By 2014, international students accounted for 10% of graduates from Canadian postsecondary institutions, up from 3% in 2000, and 11% of new permanent residents, up from 7% in 2010. This article compares the labour market performance of former international students (FISs) entering the Canadian labour market during the first decade of the 2000s to their Canadian-born-and-educated (CBE) and foreign-born-and-educated (FBE) counterparts. We find that FISs outperform FBE immigrants by a substantial margin and underperform CBE individuals graduating from similar academic programs by a relatively modest margin. We also find some limited evidence, particularly among women, of a deterioration in FIS outcomes through the 2000s relative to both comparison groups. We argue that this deterioration is consistent with a quality tradeoff as postsecondary institutions and governments have reached deeper into international student pools to meet their demands for students and new immigrants without a commensurate increase in their supply.