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Titel
The relative labour market performance of former international students : evidence from the Canadian national graduates survey / Zong Jia Chen (University of Waterloo), Mikal Skuterud (University of Waterloo and IZA) ; IZA, Institute of Labor Economics
VerfasserChen, Zong Jia In Wikipedia suchen nach Zong Jia Chen ; Skuterud, Mikal In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Mikal Skuterud
KörperschaftForschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit
ErschienenBonn, Germany : IZA Institute of Labor Economics, April 2017
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Elektronische Ressource
Umfang1 Online-Ressource (20 Seiten) : Diagramme
SerieDiscussion paper ; no. 10699
URNurn:nbn:de:hbz:5:2-121494 Persistent Identifier (URN)
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The relative labour market performance of former international students [0.46 mb]
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Zusammenfassung

Canada is increasingly looking to international students as a source of postsecondary tuition revenues and new immigrants. By 2014, international students accounted for 10% of graduates from Canadian postsecondary institutions, up from 3% in 2000, and 11% of new permanent residents, up from 7% in 2010. This article compares the labour market performance of former international students (FISs) entering the Canadian labour market during the first decade of the 2000s to their Canadian-born-and-educated (CBE) and foreign-born-and-educated (FBE) counterparts. We find that FISs outperform FBE immigrants by a substantial margin and underperform CBE individuals graduating from similar academic programs by a relatively modest margin. We also find some limited evidence, particularly among women, of a deterioration in FIS outcomes through the 2000s relative to both comparison groups. We argue that this deterioration is consistent with a quality tradeoff as postsecondary institutions and governments have reached deeper into international student pools to meet their demands for students and new immigrants without a commensurate increase in their supply.