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Titel
Does early child care attendance influence children's cognitive and non-cognitive skill development? / Daniel Kühnle (Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg and IZA), Michael Oberfichtner (Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg and IAB) ; IZA, Institute of Labor Economics
VerfasserKühnle, Daniel In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Daniel Kühnle ; Oberfichtner, Michael In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Michael Oberfichtner
KörperschaftForschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit
ErschienenBonn, Germany : IZA Institute of Labor Economics, March 2017
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Elektronische Ressource
Umfang1 Online-Ressource (88 Seiten) : Diagramme
SerieDiscussion paper ; no. 10661
URNurn:nbn:de:hbz:5:2-120932 Persistent Identifier (URN)
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Does early child care attendance influence children's cognitive and non-cognitive skill development? [1.49 mb]
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Zusammenfassung

While recent studies mostly find that attending child care earlier improves the skills of children from low socio-economic and non-native backgrounds in the short-run, it remains unclear whether such positive effects persist. We identify the short- and medium-run effects of early child care attendance in Germany using a fuzzy discontinuity in child care starting age between December and January. This discontinuity arises as children typically start formal child care in the summer of the calendar year in which they turn three. Combining rich survey and administrative data, we follow one cohort from age five to 15 and examine standardised cognitive test scores, non-cognitive skill measures, and school track choice. We find no evidence that starting child care earlier affects childrens outcomes in the short- or medium-run. Our precise estimates rule out large effects for children whose parents have a strong preference for sending them to early child care.