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Titel
A firm of one's own: experimental evidence on credit constraints and occupational choice / Andrew Brudevold-Newman (University of Maryland), Maddalena Honorati (World Bank), Pamela Jakiela (University of Maryland and IZA), Owen Ozier (World Bank) ; IZA, Institute of Labor Economics
VerfasserBrudevold-Newman, Andrew In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Andrew Brudevold-Newman ; Trionfi Honorati, Maddalena In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Maddalena Trionfi Honorati ; Jakiela, Pamela In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Pamela Jakiela ; Ozier, Owen In Wikipedia suchen nach Owen Ozier
KörperschaftForschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit
ErschienenBonn, Germany : IZA Institute of Labor Economics, February 2017
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Umfang1 Online-Ressource (43 Seiten) : Diagramme
SerieDiscussion paper ; no. 10583
URNurn:nbn:de:hbz:5:2-113330 Persistent Identifier (URN)
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A firm of one's own: experimental evidence on credit constraints and occupational choice [0.35 mb]
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Zusammenfassung

We conducted a randomized evaluation of two labor market interventions targeted to young women aged 18 to 19 in three of Nairobis poorest neighborhoods. One treatment offered participants a bundled intervention designed to simultaneously relieve credit and human capital constraints; a second treatment provided women with an unrestricted cash grant, but no training or other support. Both interventions had economically large and statistically significant impacts on income over the medium-term (7 to 10 months after the end of the interventions), but these impacts dissipated in the second year after treatment. Our results are consistent with a model in which savings constraints prevent women from smoothing consumption after receiving large transfers - even in the absence of credit constraints, and when participants have no intention of remaining in entrepreneurship. We also show that participants hold remarkably accurate beliefs about the impacts of the treatments on occupational choice.