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Titel
Conducting interactive experiments online : coverage and compliance of sectoral minimum wages in Italy / Antonio A. Arechar (Yale University), Simon Gächter (CeDEx, University of Nottingham, CESifo and IZA), Lucas Molleman (CeDEx, University of Nottingham and MPI for Human Development) ; IZA, Institute of Labor Economics
VerfasserArechar, Antonio A. In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Antonio A. Arechar ; Gächter, Simon In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Simon Gächter ; Molleman, Lucas In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Lucas Molleman
KörperschaftForschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit In der Gemeinsamen Normdatei der DNB nachschlagen In Wikipedia suchen nach Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit
ErschienenBonn, Germany : IZA Institute of Labor Economics, January 2017
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Elektronische Ressource
Umfang1 Online-Ressource (32 Seiten) : Diagramme
SerieDiscussion paper ; no. 10517
URNurn:nbn:de:hbz:5:2-110665 Persistent Identifier (URN)
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Conducting interactive experiments online [1.48 mb]
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Zusammenfassung

Online labor markets provide new opportunities for behavioral research, but conducting economic experiments online raises important methodological challenges. This particularly holds for interactive designs. In this paper, we provide a methodological discussion of the similarities and differences between interactive experiments conducted in the laboratory and online. To this end, we conduct a repeated public goods experiment with and without punishment using samples from the laboratory and the online platform Amazon Mechanical Turk. We chose to replicate this experiment because it is long and logistically complex. It therefore provides a good case study for discussing the methodological and practical challenges of online interactive experimentation. We find that basic behavioral patterns of cooperation and punishment in the laboratory are replicable online. The most important challenge of online interactive experiments is participant dropout. We discuss measures for reducing dropout and show that, for our case study, dropouts are exogenous to the experiment. We conclude that data quality for interactive experiments via the Internet is adequate and reliable, making online interactive experimentation a valuable complement to laboratory studies.